In The School

Research has shown that children with DCD do not ‘outgrow’ the condition, and that they are at greater risk of developing significant physical, social, and mental health issues. Nearly all school activities, especially when children are young, are motor activities. For pupils with DCD, motor-based school activities require tremendous effort and often lead to avoidance and a lack of success. Changes to learning environments including the classroom, playground, and gymnasium, along with adaptations to learning tools can help pupils with DCD to complete their work, demonstrate their learning progress, and meet curriculum requirements at their phase. Little changes can make a big difference. It is critical for educators to M.A.T.C.H. children’s abilities with learning tasks to help them to be successful. M.A.T.C.H. stands for Modify the Task, Alter Expectations, Teach Strategies, Change the Environment and Help by Understanding. The M.A.T.C.H. strategies are outlined in more detail below.

Observing for DCD in the School
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Tips for Changing for PE Lessons
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5 Strategies to MATCH for Success
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Tips for PE Lessons
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Tips for the Classroom
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Tips for Outside Play
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